The Landing Place

Angel’s Landing is the peak in the center of the photo.  To get access to the Angel’s Landing Trail you will stop at the Zions National Park Visitors Center at the South Entrance. There you take a bus to the 6th stop, the Grotto where the trail begins.

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11 The Beginning of the Angel’s Landing Trail

The hike is about a 5 mile round trip to the Landing.  It is considered hard but well worth it.

After finding the trailhead you will cross the street to the bridge over the North Fork of the Virgin River.  You will come to a sign pointing the way to Angel’s Landing.

1. The Beginning of the Angel’s Landing Trail

22 A Look Down at How Far You Have Come

Looking down on the trail from Walter’s Wiggles.  The trail goes from left to right.  After crossing the river you move through the foliage and up the trail cut out of the rock face.  The Trail to the right enters the narrow Refridgerator Canyon.

2. A Look Down at How Far You Have Come

33 Bottom of Walter’s Wiggles

After moving through Refridgerator Canyon on the right of the photo you enter a series of switchbacks, Walter’s Wiggles, that ascend quickly to a plateau prior to moving out to the landing.

3. Bottom of Walter’s Wiggles

44 Looking Up Walter’s Wiggles

The 21 steep switchbacks that take their name from Zion National Park’s first superintendent, Walter Ruesch.

4. Looking Up Walter’s Wiggles

55 Hikers resting on Walters Wiggles.

This isn’t the only place a rest is needed.  Wait till you get to the last 1/2 mile.

5. Hikers resting on Walters Wiggles.

66 Top of Walters Wiggles leading to Scout Lookout.

After coming out of Walters Wiggles it’s just a few more minutes and we arrive at Scout Lookout — a nice viewpoint where we can get a good look at Angels Landing and the main canyon below.

6. Top of Walters Wiggles leading to Scout Lookout.

77 Narrow Ridge from Plateau to Angel’s Landing

The final part of this hike is the fun part — you will be walking on the narrow spine of the mountain and climbing almost 500 more feet in elevation to reach the landing.

7. Narrow Ridge from Plateau to Angel’s Landing

88 Path with safety chains moving out to the landing.

There are many exposed sections where you can look down on both sides to the canyon below.  I took a business phone call on one of those sections.  My son pointed out how dumb that was.

8. Path with safety chains moving out to the landing.

99 Moving along the narrow ridge.

Narrow ridge rising to the landing.  During some parts of the year, the trail can become quite crowded.  Take your time and be courteous.  Fantastic views are available for the rest of the climb.

9. Moving along the narrow ridge.

1010 Looking back down a chain portion of the trail.

You will find plenty of chains, guard-rails, and carved steps to assist your climb.  It was hard for me to believe that we had access to this trail, given the need for the extra safety precautions.   The good news is that there are also several areas suitable for resting and taking pictures.  Catching your breath is good too.

10. Looking back down a chain portion of the trail.

1111 Panoramic view looking North from Angels Landing.

Click on the photo to see the full panoramic view created by the photographer merging three wide-angle shots.

11. Panoramic view looking North from Angels Landing.

1212 Angels Landing view looking South.

When you make it up to the final viewpoint and after all of the effort; the view is simply stunning! Even though Angels Landing is significantly lower in elevation than the rims, you get an amazing 360-degree view that rivals any other viewpoint in the park. This is a perfect place to relax and have a snack. But don’t let the friendly chipmunks fool you, they just want your goodies!

See Ya Makin Memories!

 

 

12. Angels Landing view looking South.
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